Pick up a novel in your genre and read it.

There’s nothing like a little comparison contrast when it comes to writing. Study how the writer sets up the ends of chapters, creates tension and suspense in the reader, and writes action/ dramatic scenes. Note their word choices and use of literary devices like metaphors and similes, personification.

Read it out loud.

Some sentences look amazing on the page, but when you read them out loud, oh boy. Tongue twisters annoy some readers. Too much alliteration can give your prose a sing-songy feel. Unless that’s the effect you are striving for, reading aloud can help you catch those awkward places.

Beta Readers.

Don’t rely on yourself to decide if it’s the best thing since sliced bread. Bring in some trusted readers to see what they As objective as we think we can be about our own writing, we can never be objective enough. Upcoming Writer’s Conferences –  Here’s a list of upcoming events where either I or another Writer’s Digest …

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Quit.

If all else succeeds and you’re still intent on not finishing your novel, you have a surefire fallback: Stop writing. Forget the examples of those who persevered and eventually found an agent or got published. Like Kathryn Stockett. She wrote and edited The Help over a five-year period, then got three-and-a-half  years’ worth of rejections from agents—60 …

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